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Sharpe's Waterloo Book 20 in the Richard Sharpe series.A bit of a change in the story narrative this time, the last 19 books have beenconcerned with the life and times of Richard Sharpe with a battle of some importance as a back drop But this time the narrative is well and truly about the battle of Waterloo with, the now Lt Col in Prince William of Orange s army, Richard Sharpe as a minor player.Did I miss Sharpe s presence Yes.Did it detract from the telling of the battle of Waterloo No.This is the mo Book 20 in the Richard Sharpe series.A bit of a change in the story narrative this time, the last 19 books have beenconcerned with the life and times of Richard Sharpe with a battle of some importance as a back drop But this time the narrative is well and truly about the battle of Waterloo with, the now Lt Col in Prince William of Orange s army, Richard Sharpe as a minor player.Did I miss Sharpe s presence Yes.Did it detract from the telling of the battle of Waterloo No.This is the moment that the last 19 books have been heading to, the end of the Napoleonic Wars.Bernard Cornwell s brilliance as a story teller brings the battle of Waterloo with all its blood and gore, the cost in human and horse life was horrendous, right to your favourite reading chair Talking of horses, the slaughter of these poor animals was massive Of all the death and destruction that happened on the battle field it was the horses that I felt for The soldiers chose to be there, the horses had no say in it.This is about as riveting as history gets.A highly recommended 4 star read Waterloo The True Story of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles This is the actual book that I read and reviewed here What is shown in the header is Cornwell s 20th Sharpe novel This is the first non fiction book by Bernard Cornwell, but he brings all the talent that he has honed over the years in writing his many historical novels to retelling the story of Waterloo It s worth mentioning up front that those who have read a lot of military history may be put off by the repetitiveness Waterloo The True Story of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles This is the actual book that I read and reviewed here What is shown in the header is Cornwell s 20th Sharpe novel This is the first non fiction book by Bernard Cornwell, but he brings all the talent that he has honed over the years in writing his many historical novels to retelling the story of Waterloo It s worth mentioning up front that those who have read a lot of military history may be put off by the repetitiveness of some points that he want to drive home, e.g the way that the Duke of Wellington would invariably position his forces on the reverse side of slopes to protect them from artillery fire He repeats this perhaps ten times at different times in the books Notwithstanding the repetition, I found it a great read Again, I think his skill in writing fiction that allows him to build suspense of this battle, even though you know the outcome.He starts his story as Napoleon has returned from exile and sees most of the French army join him The action really gets underway as Wellington attends a ball in Brussels, where most of his senior officers are in attendance The next day, the Allied army is underway, heading to a fateful encounter with the French forces near the small town of Waterloo Several engagements happen over the next few days, beginning with Quatre Bras Wellington, with maybe only half of forces being of the quality that he needs goes into battle, knows that if Blucher doesn t arrive with his Prussian army, he probably will lose the battle to Napoleon And he had hoped never to fight Napoleon The suspense continues to build.The battlefield action is terrible, and it is well worth reading to fully comprehend what war really meant back then You will understand how the battle was won by the British and Prussians and how it was lost by the French generals In the end, you will come to understand why Cornwell says that Napoleon was worshiped by his men, Blucher was loved by his, but Wellington was only respected by his One of the closing scenes has Wellington crying as he read over the casualty list of his officers It is a book that I will heartily recommend to anyone who wants to understand how the battle of Waterloo was fought and what it meant I d advise not reading the author s note at the end of the book, because it tips the novel s John Bull ishness right over the edge into jingoism The body of the book is hardly great literature, but it s enjoyable it could have been edited down, but as a dubiously historical recounting of Waterloo from the first skirmishes at Quatre Bras to the defeat of the Imperial Guard, it rollicks along amiably enough Its biggest flaw, however, is that Sharpe just doesn t have a much of a purpose His mov I d advise not reading the author s note at the end of the book, because it tips the novel s John Bull ishness right over the edge into jingoism The body of the book is hardly great literature, but it s enjoyable it could have been edited down, but as a dubiously historical recounting of Waterloo from the first skirmishes at Quatre Bras to the defeat of the Imperial Guard, it rollicks along amiably enough Its biggest flaw, however, is that Sharpe just doesn t have a much of a purpose His movement from place to place on the line feels very forced after a while Cornwell is clearly trying to manoeuvre him around so that he s always at the focal point of the battle, and it grows contrived I could also have done without constant mentions of Harper and his Gaelic war cries Nothing needles me quicker than cod Oirishness Firstly, my prejudices I ve been a huge fan of the TV versions of the Sharpe books I ve been an even bigger fan of the Napoleonic Wars, and Waterloo in particular I ve probably readon and around the subject than is healthy for anyone.Although I ve never actually read a Bernard Cornwell novel before, I was really looking forward, therefore, to reading his account of Richard Sharpe s contribution to the Battle of Waterloo.All the ingredients for a literary disaster therefore I had set Firstly, my prejudices I ve been a huge fan of the TV versions of the Sharpe books I ve been an even bigger fan of the Napoleonic Wars, and Waterloo in particular I ve probably readon and around the subject than is healthy for anyone.Although I ve never actually read a Bernard Cornwell novel before, I was really looking forward, therefore, to reading his account of Richard Sharpe s contribution to the Battle of Waterloo.All the ingredients for a literary disaster therefore I had set my sights so high, disappointment was the only possible outcome.But for once in my life, reality exceeded a very high expectation.Cornwell manages to hit the bullseye on all fronts here This is an historical account, as well as being a rip roaring novel he describes and develops characters superbly throughout the plot without letting the individual s persona overshadow the action he is but a small cog within he describes the visceral, stomach churning horror of 19th Century battle whilst also introducing some delightful humour such as the two junior officers, just falling into shellshock as the French cannons create bloody mayhem all around them, discussing the sport of golf I once saw a little man with a red beard playing golf at Troon into the narrative Finally, he somehow manages to capture and describe the morality of man at war, both at an individual and collective, higher level.If there is something that he leaves out of the book, it is the political context of the Battle, and the implications for both sides of winning and losing But as he says in the epilogue, there are people far better qualified than him to do this, and he is right.What impressed me most of all about this book though was the quality of the writing There is a rhythm to the author s sentences that seem to match the setting battle scenes are described in an almost staccato style, echoing the junctures between the volleys of musket shots that are being described, whereas some of thedescriptive chapters of the novel are presented in longer, languorous stanzas Everything is conveyed in a rich language which is actually very easy on the eye.I was expecting much from my first Bernard Cornwell book and my expectations were surpassed A fantastic read I ll be going back for As well written as ever The boys own adventure delivers the thrills made all the better by the historical detail and nuance. Some of my favourite Sharpe moments are in this book, and some quality comedy from when Sharpe is busy elsewhere I don t know how accurate the battle descriptions are, but they are vivid I do believe that this book will work as a standalone novel, there s enough background to catch you up, but when the back story is waiting to be read, why skip it It doesn t matter how many times I reread these, it doesn t matter that I remember all of the twists, o the little surprises, it s still an excelle Some of my favourite Sharpe moments are in this book, and some quality comedy from when Sharpe is busy elsewhere I don t know how accurate the battle descriptions are, but they are vivid I do believe that this book will work as a standalone novel, there s enough background to catch you up, but when the back story is waiting to be read, why skip it It doesn t matter how many times I reread these, it doesn t matter that I remember all of the twists, o the little surprises, it s still an excellent read JuneThe Duke of Wellington, the Prince of Orange, and Napoleon will meet on the battlefieldand decide the fate of EuropeWith the emperor Napoleon at its head, and enormous French army is marching toward Brussels The British and their allies are also converging on Brussels in preparation for a grand society ball And it is up to Richard Sharpe to convince the Prince of Orange, the inexperienced commander of Wellington s Dutch troops, to act before it is too late But Sharpe s warning cannot stop the tide of battle, and the British suffer heavy losses on the road to Waterloo Wellington has few reserves of men and ammunition the Prussian army has not arrived, and the French advance wields tremendous firepower and determinaiton Victory seems impossible [Read] ➬ Fisica 1 - Principios y Problemas By Paul W. Zitzewitz – Kleankitchen.co.uk the Prince of Orange ❰BOOKS❯ ⚣ The Beautiful Disruption Author G.G. Renee Hill – Kleankitchen.co.uk and Napoleon will meet on the battlefieldand decide the fate of EuropeWith the emperor Napoleon at its head ☉ Games Rednecks Play PDF / Epub ❤ Author Jeff Foxworthy – Kleankitchen.co.uk and enormous French army is marching toward Brussels The British and their allies are also converging on Brussels in preparation for a grand society ball And it is up to Richard Sharpe to convince the Prince of Orange [Reading] ➶ The Magic Cottage By James Herbert – Kleankitchen.co.uk the inexperienced commander of Wellington s Dutch troops [Lire] ➼ Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby: An Agile Primer (Addison-Wesley Professional Ruby Series) 1, Sandi Metz, eBook - Amazon.com ➹ Sandi Metz – Kleankitchen.co.uk to act before it is too late But Sharpe s warning cannot stop the tide of battle [Read] ➼ Eski Yunanca - Türkçe Sözlük ➹ Güler Çelgin – Kleankitchen.co.uk and the British suffer heavy losses on the road to Waterloo Wellington has few reserves of men and ammunition the Prussian army has not arrived ❮Reading❯ ➻ Dont Leave Me Alone Author GG – Kleankitchen.co.uk and the French advance wields tremendous firepower and determinaiton Victory seems impossible The 20th Sharpe novel delves into the famous battle of Waterloo and pretty much nothing else This time around, Sharpe serves in the staff of the Prince of Orange fighting the war against Napoleon The author goes to great lengths to justify Sharpe s presence in the lead up engagement and then in the main battle at Waterloo and not all of these feel very natural and Sharpe really doesn t have much to do in most of those battles and serves mostly as an observer.This is the greatest failing of the The 20th Sharpe novel delves into the famous battle of Waterloo and pretty much nothing else This time around, Sharpe serves in the staff of the Prince of Orange fighting the war against Napoleon The author goes to great lengths to justify Sharpe s presence in the lead up engagement and then in the main battle at Waterloo and not all of these feel very natural and Sharpe really doesn t have much to do in most of those battles and serves mostly as an observer.This is the greatest failing of the novel Sharpe really doesn t have anything to do but observe the battles and use a small sliver of his time to miss his farm and its apple trees and only a little bit oftime wanting his money back from his wife who s stolen it and lives with another man now.Other characters are as badly employed The worst case is a character who s entire arc consists of him being certain that he will die in the upcoming battle This is pretty much the entirety of the character so it is no wonder that the reader doesn t really care what the outcome is.The final battle the battle of Waterloo takes a lion s share of the novel and is mostly a very dull read There are a couple of occasions where Sharpe has a little to do, but even they seem tacked on It seems that the author was too worried about writing a correct description of the battle and could not have Sharpe messing it up too much.Overall, this was a surprisingly weak addition to the series especially when you consider that it is part of the original run , before Cornwell went back to write additional generally weaker novels to fill in the gaps between his earlier novels I d suspected that SHARPE S WATERLOO, the penultimate Sharpe adventure and the culmination of his adventures in the Napoleonic War, could be nothing but a triumph After all, it s a novel dedicated to one of the biggest, most remembered battles in all of history, so how could Cornwell get it wrong He built to it for a decade, honing his craft withminor but no less gripping stories before finally sitting down to tackle it.Needless to say, I loved everything about this story It s a massi I d suspected that SHARPE S WATERLOO, the penultimate Sharpe adventure and the culmination of his adventures in the Napoleonic War, could be nothing but a triumph After all, it s a novel dedicated to one of the biggest, most remembered battles in all of history, so how could Cornwell get it wrong He built to it for a decade, honing his craft withminor but no less gripping stories before finally sitting down to tackle it.Needless to say, I loved everything about this story It s a massive, epic feeling book, one that exhausts and moves you and makes you feel like you re a spectator in the battlefield Cornwell admits in his foreword that he tried to combine the story of the battle with a plot before giving up on the latter, which was the right decision Waterloo is the story in itself This is the most ferocious, bloody and terrible battle of Sharpe s entire campaign.SHARPE S WATERLOO is one of the longer Sharpe stories, clocking in at over 400 pages, but it feels like one of the shortest because the pages fly as you read I knew very little about Waterloo itself before I started this, and I m left feeling like, perhaps not an expert, but somebody who knows a great dealI m wanting to find out , too, which can only be a good thing.Just oneto go now, SHARPE S DEVIL It s been a long old slog, but this will be the year I finally finish the series It s going to be a bittersweet close one of the reading joys in my life was always knowing I had a new Sharpe novel waiting for me whenever I chose to look at it All right, I ll confess it I m a Richard Sharpe addict I have just started the last of the 21 novels read in historically chronological order, not the order written and I will miss his adventures once I m done One of the factors in my appreciation of the series is the image of Sean Bean s Sharpe portrayal from the movies very appealing , but the other is the breathtaking depiction of battle in all its glorious valor, unbelievable horror and intimate detail amid a historical setting I ca All right, I ll confess it I m a Richard Sharpe addict I have just started the last of the 21 novels read in historically chronological order, not the order written and I will miss his adventures once I m done One of the factors in my appreciation of the series is the image of Sean Bean s Sharpe portrayal from the movies very appealing , but the other is the breathtaking depiction of battle in all its glorious valor, unbelievable horror and intimate detail amid a historical setting I can see the action through Cornwell s descriptions, unlike similar passages in other authors works where I have often had to refer back to maps and occasionally have given up and skipped the details Yes, these books are fictional crack, but what a ride

    [Read] ➬ Fisica 1 - Principios y Problemas By Paul W. Zitzewitz – Kleankitchen.co.uk the Prince of Orange ❰BOOKS❯ ⚣ The Beautiful Disruption Author G.G. Renee Hill – Kleankitchen.co.uk and Napoleon will meet on the battlefieldand decide the fate of EuropeWith the emperor Napoleon at its head ☉ Games Rednecks Play PDF / Epub ❤ Author Jeff Foxworthy – Kleankitchen.co.uk and enormous French army is marching toward Brussels The British and their allies are also converging on Brussels in preparation for a grand society ball And it is up to Richard Sharpe to convince the Prince of Orange [Reading] ➶ The Magic Cottage By James Herbert – Kleankitchen.co.uk the inexperienced commander of Wellington s Dutch troops [Lire] ➼ Practical Object-Oriented Design in Ruby: An Agile Primer (Addison-Wesley Professional Ruby Series) 1, Sandi Metz, eBook - Amazon.com ➹ Sandi Metz – Kleankitchen.co.uk to act before it is too late But Sharpe s warning cannot stop the tide of battle [Read] ➼ Eski Yunanca - Türkçe Sözlük ➹ Güler Çelgin – Kleankitchen.co.uk and the British suffer heavy losses on the road to Waterloo Wellington has few reserves of men and ammunition the Prussian army has not arrived ❮Reading❯ ➻ Dont Leave Me Alone Author GG – Kleankitchen.co.uk and the French advance wields tremendous firepower and determinaiton Victory seems impossible The 20th Sharpe novel delves into the famous battle of Waterloo and pretty much nothing else This time around, Sharpe serves in the staff of the Prince of Orange fighting the war against Napoleon The author goes to great lengths to justify Sharpe s presence in the lead up engagement and then in the main battle at Waterloo and not all of these feel very natural and Sharpe really doesn t have much to do in most of those battles and serves mostly as an observer.This is the greatest failing of the The 20th Sharpe novel delves into the famous battle of Waterloo and pretty much nothing else This time around, Sharpe serves in the staff of the Prince of Orange fighting the war against Napoleon The author goes to great lengths to justify Sharpe s presence in the lead up engagement and then in the main battle at Waterloo and not all of these feel very natural and Sharpe really doesn t have much to do in most of those battles and serves mostly as an observer.This is the greatest failing of the novel Sharpe really doesn t have anything to do but observe the battles and use a small sliver of his time to miss his farm and its apple trees and only a little bit oftime wanting his money back from his wife who s stolen it and lives with another man now.Other characters are as badly employed The worst case is a character who s entire arc consists of him being certain that he will die in the upcoming battle This is pretty much the entirety of the character so it is no wonder that the reader doesn t really care what the outcome is.The final battle the battle of Waterloo takes a lion s share of the novel and is mostly a very dull read There are a couple of occasions where Sharpe has a little to do, but even they seem tacked on It seems that the author was too worried about writing a correct description of the battle and could not have Sharpe messing it up too much.Overall, this was a surprisingly weak addition to the series especially when you consider that it is part of the original run , before Cornwell went back to write additional generally weaker novels to fill in the gaps between his earlier novels I d suspected that SHARPE S WATERLOO, the penultimate Sharpe adventure and the culmination of his adventures in the Napoleonic War, could be nothing but a triumph After all, it s a novel dedicated to one of the biggest, most remembered battles in all of history, so how could Cornwell get it wrong He built to it for a decade, honing his craft withminor but no less gripping stories before finally sitting down to tackle it.Needless to say, I loved everything about this story It s a massi I d suspected that SHARPE S WATERLOO, the penultimate Sharpe adventure and the culmination of his adventures in the Napoleonic War, could be nothing but a triumph After all, it s a novel dedicated to one of the biggest, most remembered battles in all of history, so how could Cornwell get it wrong He built to it for a decade, honing his craft withminor but no less gripping stories before finally sitting down to tackle it.Needless to say, I loved everything about this story It s a massive, epic feeling book, one that exhausts and moves you and makes you feel like you re a spectator in the battlefield Cornwell admits in his foreword that he tried to combine the story of the battle with a plot before giving up on the latter, which was the right decision Waterloo is the story in itself This is the most ferocious, bloody and terrible battle of Sharpe s entire campaign.SHARPE S WATERLOO is one of the longer Sharpe stories, clocking in at over 400 pages, but it feels like one of the shortest because the pages fly as you read I knew very little about Waterloo itself before I started this, and I m left feeling like, perhaps not an expert, but somebody who knows a great dealI m wanting to find out , too, which can only be a good thing.Just oneto go now, SHARPE S DEVIL It s been a long old slog, but this will be the year I finally finish the series It s going to be a bittersweet close one of the reading joys in my life was always knowing I had a new Sharpe novel waiting for me whenever I chose to look at it All right, I ll confess it I m a Richard Sharpe addict I have just started the last of the 21 novels read in historically chronological order, not the order written and I will miss his adventures once I m done One of the factors in my appreciation of the series is the image of Sean Bean s Sharpe portrayal from the movies very appealing , but the other is the breathtaking depiction of battle in all its glorious valor, unbelievable horror and intimate detail amid a historical setting I ca All right, I ll confess it I m a Richard Sharpe addict I have just started the last of the 21 novels read in historically chronological order, not the order written and I will miss his adventures once I m done One of the factors in my appreciation of the series is the image of Sean Bean s Sharpe portrayal from the movies very appealing , but the other is the breathtaking depiction of battle in all its glorious valor, unbelievable horror and intimate detail amid a historical setting I can see the action through Cornwell s descriptions, unlike similar passages in other authors works where I have often had to refer back to maps and occasionally have given up and skipped the details Yes, these books are fictional crack, but what a ride"/>
  • Paperback
  • 384 pages
  • Sharpe's Waterloo
  • Bernard Cornwell
  • English
  • 15 May 2019
  • 0140294392

About the Author: Bernard Cornwell

Cornwell was born in London in 1944 His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother, who was English, a member of the Women s Auxiliary Air Force He was adopted and brought up in Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People, a strict Protestant sect who banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine After he left them, he changed his name to his birth mother s maiden name, Cornwell.Cornwell was sent away to Monkton Combe School, attended the University of London, and after graduating, worked as a teacher He attempted to enlist in the British armed services at least three times but was rejected on the grounds of myopia.He then joined BBC s Nationwide and was promoted to become head of current affairs at BBC Northern Ireland He then joined Thames Television as editor of Thames News He relocated to the United States in 1980 after marrying an American Unable to get a green card, he started writing novels, as this did not require a work permit.As a child, Cornwell loved the novels of C.S Forester, chronicling the adventures of fictional British naval officer Horatio Hornblower during the Napoleonic Wars, and was surprised to find there were no such novels following Lord Wellington s campaign on land Motivated by the need to support himself in the U.S through writing, Cornwell decided to write such a series He named his chief protagonist Richard Sharpe, a rifleman involved in most major battles of the Peninsular War.Cornwell wanted to start the series with the Siege of Badajoz but decided instead to start with a couple of warm up novels These were Sharpe s Eagle and Sharpe s Gold, both published in 1981 Sharpe s Eagle was picked up by a publisher, and Cornwell got a three book deal He went on to tell the story of Badajoz in his third Sharpe novel, Sharpe s Company, published in 1982.Cornwell and wife Judy co wrote a series of novels, published under the pseudonym Susannah Kells These were A Crowning Mercy, published in 1983, Fallen Angels in 1984, and Coat of Arms aka The Aristocrats in 1986 Cornwell s strict Protestant upbringing informed the background of A Crowning Mercy, which took place during the English Civil War In 1987, he also published Redcoat, an American Revolutionary War novel set in Philadelphia during its 1777 occupation by the British.After publishing eight books in his ongoing Sharpe series, Cornwell was approached by a production company interested in adapting them for television The producers asked him to write a prequel to give them a starting point to the series They also requested that the story feature a large role for Spanish characters to secure co funding from Spain The result was Sharpe s Rifles, published in 1987, and a series of Sharpe television films staring Sean Bean.A series of contemporary thrillers with sailing as a background and common themes followed Wildtrack published in 1988, Sea Lord aka Killer s Wake in 1989, Crackdown in 1990, Stormchild in 1991, and Scoundrel, a political thriller, in 1992.In June 2006, Cornwell was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen s 80th Birthday Honours List.Cornwell s latest work, Azincourt, was released in the UK in October 2008 The protagonist is an archer who participates in the Battle of Agincourt, another devastating defeat suffered by the French in the Hundred Years War However, Cornwell has stated that it will not be about Thomas of Hookton from The Grail Quest or any of his relatives.