Modern Bujutsu & Budo Volume III: Martial Arts and



10 thoughts on “Modern Bujutsu & Budo Volume III: Martial Arts and Ways of Japan

  1. Matt Matt says:

    Excellent treatment of the major veins of Japanese martial arts in the post Edo era to present okay, well, mid 70s to be precise Anyone participating or considering participating in Japanese martial arts should read this book to contextualize their practice and offer opportunity to reflect on their goals, expectations, and perception of their chosen form Draeger constructs a seamless bridge between the war era, Edo Bakufu, Meiji, and present day evolutionary processes shaping Japanese martia Excellent treatment of the major veins of Japanese martial arts in the post Edo era to present okay, well, mid 70s to be precise Anyone participating or considering participating in Japanese martial arts should read this book to contextualize their practice and offer opportunity to reflect on their goals, expectations, and perception of their chosen form Draeger constructs a seamless bridge between the war era, Edo Bakufu, Meiji, and present day evolutionary processes shaping Japanese martial arts His history of the Meiji Restoration is brief and readable, yet detailed and obviously well researched This is the first work I ve read looking at the long reaching effects of the Meiji and Taisho political agendas on the Japanese own perception their martial arts heritage.One of the major strong points of Draeger s work is that he seems to quote primarily Japanese historians and sources, thus largely avoiding the always irritating inscrutable East sentimentality found in so many Western treatments of the martial arts This tack aligns well with his clear distaste for and spot on criticisms of the carnival like entertainment and profit driven approach of many martial arts media, instructors, and practitioners.Draeger adroitly poses and addresses the fascinating question of why have the Japanese retained their martial traditions even through the rapid modernization of the Meiji era and unthinkable destructiveness caused by the ultranationalist movement and its calamitous end in WW2 How have the arts changed after the war and what purpose do they serve now I have only two criticisms of this book 1 that Draeger is too careful a historian to speculateon the latter question and 2 there do not seem to be any notes or reference citations other than author names in text in my edition anyway Number 2 is not a stab at Draeger s authority, rather I am very interested in further reading.Take home message from Draeger You re not the samurai warrior you think you are sucka


  2. Patrick Patrick says:

    If you want to really understand martial arts and its history you should get Donn Draeger s three books in this series Classical Bujutsu Martial Arts And Ways Of Japan, Vol I., Weatherhill, 1973, 1996Classical Budo Martial Arts And Ways Of Japan, Vol II., Weatherhill, 1973, 1996Modern Bujutsu Budo Martial Arts And Ways Of Japan, Vol III., Weatherhill, 1974, 1996 If you want to really understand martial arts and its history you should get Donn Draeger s three books in this series Classical Bujutsu Martial Arts And Ways Of Japan, Vol I., Weatherhill, 1973, 1996Classical Budo Martial Arts And Ways Of Japan, Vol II., Weatherhill, 1973, 1996Modern Bujutsu Budo Martial Arts And Ways Of Japan, Vol III., Weatherhill, 1974, 1996


  3. Mars Cheung Mars Cheung says:

    Donn Draeger s books offer insight in the martial arts ways of Japan but his books are generally difficult to read through as feel as though you re reading an encyclopedia Something better used as a reference I recommend Dave Lowry s works .


  4. Rich Rich says:

    Excellent essay about the progression from bujutsu to the modern budo forms.Donn Draegers books are a must read for the martial historian.


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Modern Bujutsu & Budo Volume III: Martial Arts and Ways of Japan This text is an analysis of modern bujutsu and budo