One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West before


10 thoughts on “One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West before Lewis and Clark

  1. Thomas Isern Thomas Isern says:

    A recognized classic, a landmark work not much comment needed from me 132 pages of endnotes in small print Some of the interior is hard yards All the effort is rewarded, however, in the sweeping and masterly conclusion I feel as though if one had not persevered through the entire text, one would feel like a cheater enjoying the conclusion.


  2. Jared Jared says:

    This is critical book It fits right in between Charles Mann s 1491 and 1493 It is a amazing portrait of the vast and highly changing world of the Western United States after the arrival of the Europeans Calloway covers in detail much of what has been written off as being unknowable He does this through historical records, archeology, and environmental science to present a lost history.


  3. Kyle Sullivan Kyle Sullivan says:

    Having read dozens of books on similar topics, I ve always felt I had a pretty good handle on the narratives that are pre Columbian and colonial in regards to North America Plot twist Colloway shows me that I didn t Colin Colloway does a massive thing here and gives the reader the ultimate bird s eye view on sweeping cultural and historical processes moving throughout the North American landscape over thousands of years I ve never seen it told this way The author also incorporates oral hist Having read dozens of books on similar topics, I ve always felt I had a pretty good handle on the narratives that are pre Columbian and colonial in regards to North America Plot twist Colloway shows me that I didn t Colin Colloway does a massive thing here and gives the reader the ultimate bird s eye view on sweeping cultural and historical processes moving throughout the North American landscape over thousands of years I ve never seen it told this way The author also incorporates oral history and archaeology to a very satisfying degree This book is a cornerstone for understanding the United States While his definition of the West starts at the Great Lakes and Appalachia and moves to the Pacific coast, it dips deeply into Mexico and Canada also It examines the Spanish, French, and English colonial actions from the air, shows how the pre Columbian movement of peoples dovetails into and throughout the colonial period, how ancient infrastructure informs modern cities, the rise and fall of various indigenous empires, the ultimate role of disease in massive population crashes, and he explains the true context of the various moments of resistance throughout the European invasion Tecumseh or Pontiac or Pop they were not isolated incidents, not by a long shot Instead, the individual acts of resistance are part of much larger trends occurring over centuries This much detail and this much scope paints the West as it truly isa swirling multicultural melting pot of constant movement, tragedy, triumph, and mystery The book does get slow in places But, honestly, the material demands that Keeping track of so many nations of people and so many big trends and movements must have required a crazy amount of research Some of that is going to be tough to read at times But other moments of exquisite tragedy and heartbreak carry the reader through, like the French genocide against the Mesquaki or various wars to exterminate the Osage people Nuggets of mystery, of lost colonies, of expeditions that vanished between nations, of some of the oldest known art on the continent, of entire cities of people rising and falling before a single European set foot on American shoresit ll keep you glued to the page I recommend this for anyone who wants to understand what US cultural heritage really is Our history is deeper,complex, andsurprising than is commonly known The United States Of America is just another chapter in an old, old story I would make this required reading for every public high school in the empire.From the book There is no American exceptionalism Charting the creation and subsequent decline of both Cheyenne and settler society in nineteenth century Colorado, Elliot West says simply Everything passes,no one escapes It is a simple reminder of the human condition and a simple lesson from history But it s a lesson lost in American history if we look on Jamestown, Santa Fe, the American Revolution, and the Lewis and Clark expedition as opening chapters in a story of nation building and progress, a story that, because it is our story, we assume will be different from everybody else s It won t The cycles of history will continue as they always have, and, ultimately, the only truly exceptional thing about American history is that it happened in America


  4. Scottloar Scottloar says:

    Magisterial The breadth and depth is best explained by the author To judge by most history books, public television documentaries, and popular culture, the winning of the West is the real history of the West what went before is just prelude But American history is not as short as it seems we would like it to be The West that Lewis and Clark saw was not a pristine wilderness it was a landscape that had evolved over millions of years and an environment that had been shaped by Indian and an Magisterial The breadth and depth is best explained by the author To judge by most history books, public television documentaries, and popular culture, the winning of the West is the real history of the West what went before is just prelude But American history is not as short as it seems we would like it to be The West that Lewis and Clark saw was not a pristine wilderness it was a landscape that had evolved over millions of years and an environment that had been shaped by Indian and animal life for thousands of years Crops, technologies, and rituals from Mesoamerica flora and fauna, plagues and peoples from Europe and indigenous pioneers had all altered the West long before Lewis and Clark arrived They saw an ecosystem in which abundances and scarcities of wildlife were determined by the repercussions on animal populations of human disease that thinned the ranks of human predators and intertribal warfare that created buffer zones where game flourished Lewis and Clark did not see an unchanging West, they saw a snapshot of time and place pp 428 429.I can think of no better description The details in this work are staggering, giving the feeling that for many of the times and peoples mentioned this is a breath of life so that they may be remembered if only confined to a narrative I have not a few works on Indian lore and history, including several volumes of Handbook of North American Indians, and this book rates right up there in authority


  5. Chris Anderson Chris Anderson says:

    I started this book back in New York City after spending 6 months in Southern California Los Angeles and visiting various parts of the American West for the first time I finished it in Leeds, England, where I moved in the fall for a Full Professor position in the School of Media and Communication That trajectory explains a good part of the reason why I wanted to read this book it spoke to a growing personal interest in the Western United States It doesn t explain why I found this book so I started this book back in New York City after spending 6 months in Southern California Los Angeles and visiting various parts of the American West for the first time I finished it in Leeds, England, where I moved in the fall for a Full Professor position in the School of Media and Communication That trajectory explains a good part of the reason why I wanted to read this book it spoke to a growing personal interest in the Western United States It doesn t explain why I found this book so wonderful It is a wonderful book in its integration of historical evidence, American Indian myth, and anthropological findings It paints a picture of the United States deeply at odds with our traditional understanding of the West as a depopulated and empty land And it reminds us that the European presence in North America is so short as to constitute the blink of an eye in historical time West Yorkshire, where I am sitting and writing this review, is an old place But Southern California is old too, just in a different way


  6. Richard Pierce Richard Pierce says:

    Imagine, if you can, your world without borders Unless you ve seen the Atlantic or Pacific oceans, your world has no limits The only governing factor is survivability If you can live there, you can stay there This is the beginning of the Native American history in the American West.Calloway presents a broad history of the Native American history of the west trans Mississippi and the areas surrounding it that ultimately affected its history Comprehensive but not tedious Well researched bu Imagine, if you can, your world without borders Unless you ve seen the Atlantic or Pacific oceans, your world has no limits The only governing factor is survivability If you can live there, you can stay there This is the beginning of the Native American history in the American West.Calloway presents a broad history of the Native American history of the west trans Mississippi and the areas surrounding it that ultimately affected its history Comprehensive but not tedious Well researched but concise considering the volume of data available It is an excellent recap or summarization for the vast number of peoples involved in this history He presents a concise history covering topics that others have written complete books about It can be considered a good introduction or a good summarization of Native American history depending on your level of expertise on the subject


  7. Diane G. Diane G. says:

    One vast epic work An amazing synthesis of Native American and Euro American activity in North America from prehistory to 1800, this work has a global approach, connecting up the pieces we usually get in less ambitious histories While I have read many books about various tribes at various times, along with studies of Europeans in N America and US history, I was delighted to learn evenI had no idea how successful tribes like the Comanches and Osage were for centuries at trade and warfar One vast epic work An amazing synthesis of Native American and Euro American activity in North America from prehistory to 1800, this work has a global approach, connecting up the pieces we usually get in less ambitious histories While I have read many books about various tribes at various times, along with studies of Europeans in N America and US history, I was delighted to learn evenI had no idea how successful tribes like the Comanches and Osage were for centuries at trade and warfare Even a little fact like the number of trading ships off the NW coast in the early 19th century changed how I view the Lewis Clark expedition I was constantly reading some interesting piece out loud to my husband So much information so interestingly presented This is the third of Calloway s books I have read and by far my favorite


  8. Jbondandrews Jbondandrews says:

    A fantastic book, so much information


  9. Robert Humphries Robert Humphries says:

    In the minds of many American history begins in either 1492 or 1776 Even today, the history of the western United States is seen almost entirely through the narrative of manifest destiny Calloway s book challenges this mindset by presenting a comprehensive history of the West and its inhabitants from their first footsteps from Beringia into the interior to the beginning of the United States westward expansion Of course, it is no suprise that the bulk of the book covers the period after Europ In the minds of many American history begins in either 1492 or 1776 Even today, the history of the western United States is seen almost entirely through the narrative of manifest destiny Calloway s book challenges this mindset by presenting a comprehensive history of the West and its inhabitants from their first footsteps from Beringia into the interior to the beginning of the United States westward expansion Of course, it is no suprise that the bulk of the book covers the period after European contact, from which time written accounts were kept by explorers and colonial administrations Earlier chapters are based on archaeological evidence and to a lesser extent, the folk memories of Native American cultures Calloway s treatment is balanced this is not a political screed with villains and victims Rather, it is a nuanced chronicle of the interplay of different cultures with each other and the environment Impermanence is the only constant Sophisticated cultures rose and collapsed People migrated thousands of miles on foot in mere centuries Tribes dissipated and new nations coalesced in response to the arrival of Spanish colonists, French traders and later, Anglo American settlers Native Americans found themselves connected to trading networks that eventually stretched from Europe to China and beyond Ultimately, they found their most devastating foe in smallpox This is very much an account of the influence of Guns, Germs and Horses, on Native America, if you ll pardon the paraphrasing of Jared Diamond s bestselling title Calloway is less environmentally deterministic than Diamond, and human agency looms large in One Vast Winter Count, but admittedly there is little room for an examination of individual lives against such a vast backdrop of time and space Consequently, some readers may find it dry and difficult Nevertheless, whether discussing the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, the role of the Caddos in trade between the Mississippi and the Southwest, or the impact of the American Revolution on the Ohio Valley, Calloway is detailed and perceptive One Vast Winter Count is at heart a powerful argument for beginning American history truly at the beginning, and is an admirable volume in every respect


  10. Oona Oona says:

    Actual American history for those interested in un brainwashing themselves.


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One Vast Winter Count: The Native American West before Lewis and Clark This magnificent, sweeping work traces the histories of the Native peoples of the American West from their arrival thousands of years ago to the early years of the nineteenth century Emphasizing conflict and change, One Vast Winter Count offers a new look at the early history of the region by blending ethnohistory, colonial history, and frontier history Drawing on a wide range of oral and archival sources from across the West, Colin G Calloway offers an unparalleled glimpse at the lives of generations of Native peoples in a western land soon to be overrun [BOOKS] ✫ Rumor Has It (Texas Cattleman’s Club: A Missing Mogul Author Maureen Child – Kleankitchen.co.uk sweeping work traces the histories of the Native peoples of the American West from their arrival thousands of years ago to the early years of the nineteenth century Emphasizing conflict and change ❮Download❯ ➸ CEOs Marriage Seduction / His Style of Seduction Author Anna DePalo – Kleankitchen.co.uk One Vast Winter Count offers a new look at the early history of the region by blending ethnohistory ➽ [Download] ✤ ネクラートホリック [Nekrateholic] By Maguro Wasabi ➲ – Kleankitchen.co.uk colonial history [Read] ➱ Wycliffe and the Cycle of Death ➹ W.J. Burley – Kleankitchen.co.uk and frontier history Drawing on a wide range of oral and archival sources from across the West [PDF / Epub] ✪ All The Flowers in Paris ☆ Sarah Jio – Kleankitchen.co.uk Colin G Calloway offers an unparalleled glimpse at the lives of generations of Native peoples in a western land soon to be overrun


About the Author: Colin G. Calloway

Colin G Calloway is John Kimball Jr 1943 Professor of History and Native American Studies at Dartmouth College His previous books include A Scratch of the Pen and The Victory with No Name.